SCRAMBLOG

Scrambling through the world of MMA, BJJ and grappling

Lactate based GPP Circuits

by William Wayland ~ posted August 9th, 2015

Its not sexy but we all need GPP in our lives, often diving straight into a heavy strength training program especially after a serious competition season can wear on you scrambler. Ease yourself in and expand your base ready for your ‘offseason’.

Continuing from last week posts Aerobic GPP the next phase is Lactate based EDT training based on Cal Dietz GPP method which I’ve been experimenting with for a little while. After the aerobic phase we have hopefully built a base of general aerobic fitness. The intention is now to build lactate specific qualities but locally for improved sprint ability but also tax the body globally for continued aerobic training effect. Cal talks about this here starting at about 40 mins.  This part of a six week plan Aerobic, Lactic and Alactic. Let me just warn you this is HARD really hard. Most the athlete I’ve used this with have found it very difficult in the last minute. Don’t be a hero and ignore the listed loading. Do the work, like Dietz says this about being able to train harder and increase volume for when the heavier stuff comes.

Sample Session – Used with athletes below
Warm-up

 Bench and Ring Row – 5 Mins 10 rep each alternating (35-45% of 1RM)

  • 5 Mins mobility. Band Pull apart/spiderman with reach/Six Point Zenith

Right Leg and Left leg Step-up 5 Mins 10 rep each alternating (35-45%)

  • 5 Mins mobility. Band dislocation/Alternating half pigeon/half kneeling press (light)

Close Grip Push-up, Barbell Curl and OH sit-up 5 Mins 10 rep each alternating (35-45%)

  • Foam Rolling, band based stretching, iso holds.

In the video’s below MMA fighter Matt Hughes is going as quickly as possible will look to speed up over the next 2 weeks EDT style aiming for 2-3 sessions a week.

Bench and Ring Row 

Right Leg and Left leg Step-up


This is an ongoing series of blog posts from William Wayland of Powering Through, who works with UFC, Cagewarriors and other high level combat athletes based in Chelmsford, UK. Facebook

Aerobic GPP Circuits

by William Wayland ~ posted July 27th, 2015

Its not sexy but we all need GPP in our lives, often diving straight into a heavy strength training program especially after a serious competition season can wear on you scrambler. Ease yourself in and expand your base ready for your ‘offseason’.

When we kick off a training cycle in will generally start with General Physical Preparedness. I like to think of it as the program before the program! This is period that should serve as break from “hard” training but provide stimulus and lay foundation for harder work to come.

What is GPP? Those of your familiar with training parlance may have heard the term before. Many often talk about it but what they often mean is ‘cardio’ or ‘conditioning’.

“GPP is the initial stage of training. It starts every cycle of training from the macro-, meso- and microcycle after restoration and recovery. It consists primarily of general preparatory and some specialized conditioning exercises to work all the major muscles and joints. This preparation prepares the athlete for the more intense training such as explosive plyometrics. This period is also used for rehabilitation of injured muscles and joints, strengthening or bringing up to par the lagging muscles and improvement of technique.” – Dr Michael Yessis

A simpler definition would be improving your quality of movement, fixing weakness that have cropped up during previous training camps and enhancing your ability to handle greater workloads. Now often GPP just means more undirected hardwork. Often taking the form of old school circuit training, running and pushing a sled till you puke.

What GPP should be used for is the capacity to do work when the harder training gets going, fixing imbalances and mobility and reinforcing movement quality, its important to note however the training is not really sports specific. Inspired by Cal Dietz I’ve been toying with Aerobic GPP circuits for a little while. These always come before we start our heavier lifting blocks. Instead of doing things like running or circuits, im increasingly preferring to keep my athletes lifting. Especially if like many of the MMA fighters the time we have together is very limited.

We take simple compound exercise pairings and put them together and have the athlete alternate between them for 5 minutes at about 50-60% loading going rep for rep. Each session the athlete will try and do more reps within the same amount of time or try for more reps within 30s chunks of the whole 5 minutes. Some of your might recognize this as EDT style training. Between 5 minute work block we can schedule 5 minute mobility and balancing work. Got tight shoulders mobilise those and strength your upper back. Got tight hips look to add a yoga flow or some bodyweight lunge and leg stretches.

Sample Session – Used with athletes below

Warm-up

 Bench and Squat – 5 Mins 1 rep each alternating (60% of 1RM)

  • 5 Mins mobility. Band Pull apart/spiderman with reach/Six Point Zenith

Pull-up and DB RDL 5 Mins 1 rep each alternating (60%)

  • 5 Mins mobility. Band dislocation/Alternating half pigeon/half kneeling press (light)

Close Grip Bench and Chin-ups 5 Mins 1 rep each alternating (60%)

  • Foam Rolling, band based stretching, iso holds.

In the video’s below MMA fighter Matt Hughes is going at pretty moderate tempo seeing as this is his first session performing this type of work and will look to speed up over the next 2 weeks aiming for 2-3 sessions a week.

Aerobic GPP circuit – Bench and Squat

Pull-up RDL

Close Grip Bench and Chins

Pairings should try and hit as many muscle groups as possible and work well as upperbody/lower splits and upper body, upper body split. Having lowerbody exercises paired would probably be too fatiguing and defeat the point of aerobic intent of this type of training. You could always try Sumo Deadlift/Weighted Pushups or Overhead Press/Barbell Rows. Hopefully now you have enough to build your own 2-3 week barbell based GPP program.

This is an ongoing series of blog posts from William Wayland of Powering Through, who works with UFC, Cagewarriors and other high level combat athletes based in Chelmsford, UK. Facebook

[VIDEO]Catch Wrestling Exhibition Match

by Matt - Scramble ~ posted July 22nd, 2015

Personally, I think the revival of interest in Catch Wrestling is one of the best things to happen to grappling recently.

Here’s Colleen Schneider going at it with Shayna Baszler at the recent Jiu Jitsu in the Park, with Josh Barnett refereeing.

 

 

 

 

Scramble x Newaza.

[VIDEO] BJJ Hacks – Marcelo Garcia NYC

by Matt - Scramble ~ posted July 3rd, 2015

(Our limited edition, sold out MG x SCR shirts.)

 

Another instalment in the excellent BJJ Hacks x NYC series!

Featuring the Man, the Myth, the Legend, Marcelo Garcia!

 

[VIDEO] Gina Hopkins – Disabled Fight Club (Channel 4)

by Matt - Scramble ~ posted July 2nd, 2015

Check this out!

The amazing Gina Hopkins, with whom we travelled to New York, is featured on this mini Channel 4 documentary.

Please watch, and share the inspirational story of how someone with disabilities not only overcomes them but smashes them to pieces and trains jiu jitsu too.

Click here to watch.

Neck Training

by William Wayland ~ posted July 1st, 2015

This post was inspired after scrambles very own Matt Benyon asked me about neck training, very over due heres a few video’s I like and some rational behind good neck training.

Neck training often winds up being an after thought or a peripheral to squatting and dead-lifting. In contact sports however it may be as important as everything else.

A thick neck and cauliflower ears are often the hall marks of a top wrestler or grappler. Not only does it look gnarly but it also serves a functional purpose. Contact sports athletes need strong necks as “increasing athletes’ neck strength and reducing unanticipated impacts may decrease the risk of concussion associated with sport participation” http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24488820 . Additionally a strong jaw and solid clench can also limit trauma having the ability to bite down or clench on a mouthpiece with force prior to a collision to also limit concussion. There is some evidence also that tired neck muscle can effect locomotion and coordination so having a stronger more fatigue resistant neck musculature may make a difference. For more on this I suggest you checkout Mike Gittlesons neck training article for the NCAA here.

I’ve listed below a few favourite neck exercises that are really easy to implement either with a band a partner or a med ball, no goofy head harnesses honest! We often perform our neck exercises at the end of sessions. It does stand to reason however that if you have had a serious neck injury in the past consult with a physio or doctor before trying this stuff out!

With a Partner

With a Band

With a Swiss Ball

This is an ongoing series of blog posts from guest blogger and Strength & Conditioning coach William Wayland of Powering Through, who works with UFC, Cagewarriors and other high level combat athletes based in Chelmsford, UK. Facebook

[VIDEO] Genki Sudo’s Ikkiuchi 2nd Tournament Highlights

by Matt - Scramble ~ posted June 23rd, 2015

 

The second iteration of Genki Sudo’s Ikkiuchi is over. These highlights show what this uniquely Japanese competition has to offer.

It takes place in a temple, with a small crowd.

The thing I take away from it is the Japanese spirit when competing in BJJ – I do not think “stalling” is in their vocabulary.

 

Dare to dream by Gina Hopkins

by Ben ~ posted June 4th, 2015

Dare to dream…..

Gold and Bronze comes to the U.K., comes back to female fighters, comes back to my community, comes back to my supporters, comes back to my sponsors. Gold and Bronze…..

I genuinely don’t know what makes me more proud, helping to pull off this amazing tournament orbringing fruition in everyone’s investment in me.  I went to this tournament with a lot of my own investment and with a lot of investment from my local community, I went to make my point for disabled women in combat sports.  Being the only female and weighing in under the lightest category I went to fight for my principles, pride and respect, not daring to dream of bringing home medals.  I still wonder if I was dreaming everything that happened in New York.

With so much invested in this tournament and with my ‘’support crew’’ in tow (family, friends and sponsors), I was incredibly calm. It was one of those surreal moments where you don’t know what to expect, so what emotion can you express.  Being task orientated I just wanted to focus on my logistics, getting the right food and nutrients, going over my game plans and being crystal clear on the rules I was fighting under. I was the first competitor to arrive and the atmosphere soon became electric and we quickly all became one family.

Renzo Gracie academy, eagerness to compete, all proud to be representing our [disabled] population and ready to support everyone else.  What an atmosphere… we’re all on a mission!

Although we had a friendly, positive and supportive atmosphere, it was clear we were all there to compete and compete hard.  It was a beautifully liberating tournament, there was no judgement, no presumptions, no “taking it easy”.  It’s commonplace for able-bodied people to refuse to roll or fight with us disabled, it has been said that it’s a lose-lose situation for the able-bodied person. They either beat a disabled person or they get beaten by someone with a disability.

My mother always said “People either get it, or they don’t” in regards to disability.  My mother is very perceptive, I don’t think I need to expand on how this relates to that perception of fighting a disabled athlete.

This is, however, exactly why we need to have tournaments like Grapplers Heart. To showcase how we adapt and to show how disability can be an advantage. We saw so many awesome examples of this successful adaptation at the tournament.

Even though I won my Neuromuscular category, it was far from easy. These guys were strong, stronger than any able-bodied guys I’ve rolled with! Sorry lads!  These guys were beasts in terms of strength, unfortunately with myself being the one of the few who walked unassisted, this worked as a disadvantage as I was just not as strong.  Luckily, I have some teammates who like to pummel into me (in a controlled but fabulously fun and brutal way!), so I was prepared and I had a game plan!

Incredibly, my teammates will know how hard it is to choke me out, but the raw strength of one the guys with a Spinal Cord Injury was too much for me!  I escaped a few attempts of chokes and I got some good positions but that arm strength was amazing, even the toughest guys I know would have been envious at that applied strength he had.I would dare anyone who thinks they wouldn’t tap to a choke to roll with Brian! The guy who won the absolute was even scarier (sorry Shannon!) his arms were massive.  I didn’t feel nervous about any of my fights but if I’d of had to fight Shannon, I think I may have been apprehensive!  I would have certainly played a very tactical game of “give nothing away, under any circumstance”! It would have been fun though…

I had the time of my life, I enjoyed every minute, loved everyone, made lifelong friends, learnt a lot and have a lot of homework… for next year!!

Please remember if you’re fighting someone disabled, on the whole we have something over you and not the other way around. We have learnt to adapt and can surprise the best of you.

Fight us if you dare!

 

Classic S&C Mistakes made by grapplers and MMA fighters

by William Wayland ~ posted May 27th, 2015

On your quest to supplement your BJJ and MMA with strength and conditioning for a stronger, better and healthier version of yourself you will find pitfalls and missteps along the way. However years of experience from strength coaches and athletes can help you in avoid all too common mistakes when it comes to strength and conditioning.

Copying ‘famous’ athletes training program or workouts.

Many athletes share clips on instagram and facebook of what they are doing which is a great insight and often very interesting. Much is made of the workouts of George St Pierre, Rhonda Rousey, Gabi Garcia or Andre Galvo they get a ton of re-shares on social media. But before you breakout the rings and Bulgarian bags consider that these instances, these brief glimpses into someone else’s training are merely snap shots. We have no context for the conditions that have led them to that particular exercise or work out. They key point is here is that you need a program that meets YOUR needs.

Following popular powerlifting programs

When many often set off on their quest for a good strength program they’ll often take to the internet. After a quick google you’ll probably wind up with a ton of recommendations. But more often than not you’ll find a powerlifting inspired lifting routine. Don’t get me wrong some of the more popular powerlifting ebook routines has been responsible for helping people get really strong and make consistent results. However the key flaw is in the intent of they programs, they are for getting better at the powerlifts. Regularly heavy lifting is extremely neurologically demanding and past a point yields diminishing returns (see point 4!). A program like this often won’t take in to account just how draining a full schedule of MMA or grappling practice can be. Lack of variability in intensity fails to account for those type of situations. You may end up getting hurt and no body wants that!

Listening to functional movement guru’s

Biggest driver of strength gain is progressive loading and you won’t find that in a yoga class or from swinging an expensive kettle bell in the shape of a skull. The notion of functional movement seems appealing as it creates a false dichotomy, the idea that anything else (usually some method they don’t like) is some how non-functional.  Often these people speak is flowery anatomical terms which sound pretty convincing and talk about neurophysiology of movement using nebulous concepts or confusing jargon, they are Depak Chopra’s of fitness. They also often violate basic strength training principles, such as progressive overload or argue for over emphasis on stability type training despite the efficacy for such training for healthy athletes not holding up under scrutiny. My other suspicion is that this stuff is the preserve of people who have never really learned to lift properly in the first place. Step off the bosu ball, put down your soy latte and go learn to front squat. If you are dysfunctional see a physio or a decent strength coach.

More is better blues

At over 2.5 x BW I don’t think Arnold Allen needs more Deadlift in his life

I love this term  and it relates to some extent the previous points, S&C super coach Vern Gambetta summed it up in a short blog post “Volume is a seductive trap. At younger training ages virtually anything an athlete does will make them better. The more they do, the better they get – up to a point. That point is something we recognize as the point of diminishing returns. But despite the diminishing returns it is very tempting to continue on that path because that is what got them to that point. This is where the more is better blues occurs in the form of stagnation, performance plateaus or injury. Now what? More is not better, better is better. The emphasis must shift to quality training and perfect effort.” As you adapt training emphasis must change, see how strong is strong enough? post from earlier this month.

This is an ongoing series of blog posts from guest blogger and Strength & Conditioning coach William Wayland of Powering Through, who works with UFC, Cagewarriors and other high level combat athletes based in Chelmsford, UK. Facebook

[VIDEO] BJJ Hacks: Eddie Wolverine

by Matt - Scramble ~ posted May 13th, 2015

Hywel Teague and the BJJ Hacks team have done it again, with a whole series of videos filmed in the Big Apple.

First up is Eddie Wolverine, someone we (alongside our friends at Newaza Apparel) are very proud to sponsor.

Queue it up and enjoy!